Site Name: Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting
Site URL: http://www.azcir.org/
John H. Loughery
Dates of Analysis: 2 April 2013- 15 April 2013
Geographic Reach: Arizona Area

Screen shot 2013-05-09 at 3.01.27 PM.png



Type of Site: independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to accountability reporting in Arizona

Demographic Summary:
Site-specific demographic data for AZCIR.org was collected from Alexa.com on April 2, 2013. Alexa.com did not collect data for this particular site.
Alexa_AZCIR.jpg




Representation: The Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting is an independent, nonprofit organization dedicated to accountability reporting in the Arizona area. The site covers issues such as corruption to government waste to immigration to the environment. AZCIR.org will hold people and organizations accountable for the things that matter in Arizona. They do this through innovative, interactive and in-depth investigative reporting that is published digitally on www.AZCIR.org and through partnerships with other Arizona news outlets. As a nonprofit organization dedicated to accountability reporting in Arizona, the site has several Partners and Memberships. Some of these Partners include ASU Morrison Institute for Public Policy, Arizona Capitol Times, Florida Center for Investigative Reporting, TucsonSentinel.com, DowntownDevil, Gangplank, and The State Press. All of the stories are shown on the home page and the full story is shown. If you continue to scroll down the home page you are able to see stories posted from earlier dates. If the site isn't being updated with stories, it is most likely not going to change at all until the next story is posted. The site does a bad job at updating its information and there are rarely any images or charts shown with the stories. Down the left hand side of the home page is a menu bar that allows the reader the navigate the site, however there are not many links. The links include the home page, projects, contribute, about us, contact us, and use or content. On the top left of the home page is a big blue button which the reader can click on in order to "Contribute Today." There are very small Twitter and Facebook icons at the top right hand side of the home page. Overall, the site is very bland lacking in any creativity and does a bad job at drawing the reader in.


Content Analysis

Male
Female
Don't Know
TOTALS
White
2


2
Black




Hispanic/Latino




Asian




Native American




TOTALS
2




*100% White Male



Geographic Data

Location
Zipcode
County
Unemployment (%)
Average Household Size
Population
Median Household Income ($)
Tucson, AZ
85708
Pima County, AZ
5.4
2.8
345
46,000
Phoenix, AZ
85032
Maricopa County, AZ
6
2.7
73,844
99,000
Arizona City, AZ/ Eloy, AZ
85123
Pinal County, AZ
4.3
3
3,466
43,500
Phoenix, AZ/ Scottsdale, AZ
85254
Maricopa County, AZ
6.6
2.8
51,185
111,000
Tucson, AZ
85710
Pima County, AZ
5.4
2.7
52,290
65,000
Phoenix, AZ/ Tempe, AZ/ Scottsdale, AZ
85008
Maricopa County, AZ
5.3
2.6
61,622
55,000




Production: The home page stories were only updated once throughout the 14 days of analysis. We conducted this analysis of the home page stories by taking daily screenshots of the hyperlocal. The stories seem to be written by different people, but there is rarely any change to the format of the site. Each new story is displayed on the home page. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting did not really include any images with their stories, besides a very small image on a story regarding Arizona Capitol TImes.


Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting_screengrab_04022013.jpg

Identity: AZCIR.org was founded by Andrew Long and Brandon Quester. They are both associate directors that are working hard to to raise initial funding and set up the infrastructure for the nonprofit organization. Andrew Long is a self-employed journalist who specializes in data analysis and visualization. Brandon Quester is a multimedia journalist and a investigative reporter.


Consumption: The site welcomes comments and suggestions from its readers and also is seeking educational, business, and media partners to help them share high quality investigative journalism throughout the Arizona area. It is very difficult to access who the audience is because there is no Alexa.com data for the site but my guess would be anyone interested in investigative journalism throughout the state of Arizona. Viewers most likely are educated with a stable job and a respectable amount of income. The only image displayed throughout the 14 days of analysis was a small picture of 2 white men. This particular story talked about how the site collaborated with the Arizona Capitol Times on analyzing more than 2.3 million votes that were cast from the November 6 General Election.

Regulation: Arizona for Investigative Reporting is a nonprofit organization. The site has been relying on foundation grants and individual donations to build the organization and to keep it running. According to the About us part of the site, they hope to eventually shift their current regulation to a sustainable business model with a community-supported structure, where the site's daily operations are funded by community donations, media partnerships, events and investigative journalism training seminars. They rely on its readers for donations so they have a Contribute Today tab located on the home page and under the navigation tab. The site has a fundraising policy and all donations over $5000 require board approval and all funders are publicly identified.


Evaluation: Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting provides accountability reporting throughout Arizona. It is very hard to provide any type of content analysis as Alexa.com does not provide any demographic information for this site. Although the site was rarely updated through the 14 days of analysis, it is evident that the stories published were in-depth and provided a great deal of innovative information. It does not seem like the site has a positive future at this point as there are not many people commenting on the stories and there really isn't enough images provided with the information. The site is very bland and it is very hard to conduct any type of analysis based on the lack of data provided from AZCIR.org, Alexa.com, and CityData.com.


Bibliography:
Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. (n.d.). Retrieved April 2, 2013, from Alexa the Web Information Company website: http://alexa.com

City-Data.com. (n.d.). Retrieved April 2, from City-Data.com website: http://city-data.com

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 2, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 3, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 4, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 5, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 6, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 7, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 8, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 9, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 10, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 11, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 12, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 13, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 14, 2013, from http://azcir.org

Long, A. (n.d.). Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Arizona Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from http://azcir.org